National Fisherman

The United Nations’ (UN) Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) called for prompt and sustainable actions to help rebuild the livelihoods of those in the fisheries and aquaculture sectors in the regions affected by Typhoon Haiyan, which struck the Philippines.  

According to preliminary assessments by the Philippines’ Department of Agriculture, small-scale fishers were the worst-affected by the calamity, While larger commercial boats suffered less damage, several small boats and fishing gear were either destroyed or damaged. About 16,500 seaweed farmers – mostly women – lost their livelihoods.

The typhoon flattened crucial infrastructure, including jetties, landing ports, on-shore ice and cold storage facilities, boat repair and maintenance facilities, processing factories and markets. Key aquaculture infrastructure, including oyster rafts, crab, shrimp and mussel farms, as well as inland tilapia cages, hatcheries and fish ponds, was also destroyed.

“Although we still only have a partial picture, it is clear that the damage caused to the fisheries sector is immense and spans the entire value chain, from catch to market,” said Rodrigue Vinet, acting FAO representative in the Philippines, adding that in the context of livelihoods, these losses were crippling.

Read the full story at F&B News>>

Inside the Industry

The anti-mining group Salmon Beyond Borders expressed disappointment and dismay last week at Alaska Governor Bill Walker’s announcement that he has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with B.C. Premier Christy Clark.

This came just days after his administration asked members of his newly-formed Transboundary Rivers Citizens Advisory Work Group to provide comment on a Draft Statement of Cooperation associated with Transboundary mining.


NMFS recently released a draft action plan for fish discard and release mortality science, creating a list of actions that they hope can better inform fisheries.

We know that fishermen have to deal with bycatch by discarding or releasing unwanted catch overboard, but there is a data gap regarding how those fish survive.

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Diversified Business Communications