National Fisherman

Cold weather and heavy winds will soon drive hordes of silver mullet from area creeks and bays to the coastline for the annual fall run, when females gather in large numbers to release this year’s roe, otherwise known as eggs.
 
Mullet are a staple fish in the food chain — preyed upon by everything from snook and redfish to dolphins and coastal birds — and a boon to commercial fishermen and seafood markets, at least during good seasons.
 
“There’s a lot of mullet around, but it’s weather-related,” said Jeff Haugland, owner of Island Crab Company in St. James City. “They get more full of roe (during late fall), and they’ll come out in the open and haul butt for the passes and be gone.”
 
Mullet were in smaller creeks, canals and rivers in recent days. The next cold front may drive this year’s breeders to the Gulf of Mexico, where the fish remain in a trance-like condition until the eggs are released. These silver fish eat mostly algae and tiny marine invertebrates and roam the coast in schools ranging from a few fish to several hundred or more.
 
“They’re starting to roll up, but the percentages aren’t there yet,” Haugland said. “A few places up north are cutting roe out. It will probably be a week before we get them.”
 
Read the full story at the Florida Sun Times>>

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

NMFS announced two changes in regulations that apply to federal fishing permit holders starting Aug. 26.

First, they have eliminated the requirement for vessel owners to submit “did not fish” reports for the months or weeks when their vessel was not fishing.

Some of the restrictions for upgrading vessels listed on federal fishing permits have also been removed.

Read more...

Alaskans will meet with British Columbia’s Minister of Energy and Mines, Bill Bennett, when he visits Juneau next week and will ask him to support an international review of mine developments in northwest British Columbia, upstream from Southeast Alaska along the Taku, Stikine and Unuk transboundary rivers.

Some Alaska fishing and environmental groups believe an international review is the best way to develop specific, binding commitments to ensure clean water, salmon, jobs and traditional and customary practices are not harmed by British Columbia mines and that adequate financial assurances are in place up front to cover long-term monitoring and compensation for damages.

Read more...
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