National Fisherman

Cold weather and heavy winds will soon drive hordes of silver mullet from area creeks and bays to the coastline for the annual fall run, when females gather in large numbers to release this year’s roe, otherwise known as eggs.
Mullet are a staple fish in the food chain — preyed upon by everything from snook and redfish to dolphins and coastal birds — and a boon to commercial fishermen and seafood markets, at least during good seasons.
“There’s a lot of mullet around, but it’s weather-related,” said Jeff Haugland, owner of Island Crab Company in St. James City. “They get more full of roe (during late fall), and they’ll come out in the open and haul butt for the passes and be gone.”
Mullet were in smaller creeks, canals and rivers in recent days. The next cold front may drive this year’s breeders to the Gulf of Mexico, where the fish remain in a trance-like condition until the eggs are released. These silver fish eat mostly algae and tiny marine invertebrates and roam the coast in schools ranging from a few fish to several hundred or more.
“They’re starting to roll up, but the percentages aren’t there yet,” Haugland said. “A few places up north are cutting roe out. It will probably be a week before we get them.”
Read the full story at the Florida Sun Times>>

Inside the Industry

NMFS has awarded 16 grants totaling more than $2.5 million as part of its Bycatch Reduction Engineering Program.

The program supports the development of technological solutions and changes in fishing practices designed to minimize bycatch and aims to to find creative approaches and strategies for reducing bycatch, seabird interactions, and post-release mortality in federally managed fisheries.


Abe Williams, who was elected to the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association board last spring, has been selected as the new president as of September.

Williams fishes the F/V Crimson Fury, and is president of Nuna Resources, a nonprofit that supports sustainable resource development in rural Alaska, including fighting for an international solution to issues raised by the proposed Pebble Mine project.

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