National Fisherman

As the 100 percent owner of the proposed Pebble Mine in the Bristol Bay region of southwest Alaska -- after British mining giant Anglo American walked away from the project in September -- the Canadian corporation Northern Dynasty Minerals is beating the bushes for a new "money partner." On Thanksgiving, its CEO Ron Thiessen published an op-ed in the Anchorage Daily News, promising remarkable things if Pebble is built, like thousands of jobs, $100,000-a-year salaries for mine workers, and vast sums added to the state economy.
Notably, Mr. Thiessen begins his plea for investors with the famous quotation from Mark Twain about his death being "an exaggeration." In the case of Pebble Mine, perhaps a more apt Mark Twain quote would have been his definition of a mine -- that is, "a hole in the ground owned by liars."
As Anglo American figured out (along with Mitsubishi Corporation when it withdrew in 2010), the Pebble Mine is unlikely to be built any time soon. That's because opposition to this uniquely reckless project is deep and wide-ranging, consistently polling at over 80 percent opposition in the Bristol Bay region and 60 percent opposition state wide. One of the reasons is that, according to EPA's comprehensive Watershed Assessment, Pebble will have devastating (even catastrophic) impacts on the region and the Bristol Bay wild salmon fishery, the greatest of its kind in the world. 
Read the full story at the Huffington Post>>

Inside the Industry

The anti-mining group Salmon Beyond Borders expressed disappointment and dismay last week at Alaska Governor Bill Walker’s announcement that he has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with B.C. Premier Christy Clark.

This came just days after his administration asked members of his newly-formed Transboundary Rivers Citizens Advisory Work Group to provide comment on a Draft Statement of Cooperation associated with Transboundary mining.


NMFS recently released a draft action plan for fish discard and release mortality science, creating a list of actions that they hope can better inform fisheries.

We know that fishermen have to deal with bycatch by discarding or releasing unwanted catch overboard, but there is a data gap regarding how those fish survive.

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