National Fisherman


PORT LAVACA - When Curtis Miller, 52, of Port Lavaca, was 12, he would walk along Lavaca Bay picking up oysters to bring home to his family.
 
He didn't have an oyster knife - a dull, short-bladed knife used to pry open oyster shells. Instead, he used whatever household knife he could find in the kitchen.
"You may have heard the phrase, 'The world is your oyster,'" Miller said. "Well, oyster is my world."
 
His uncle started Miller's Seafood, a wholesale and retail oyster house, about 40 years ago. Miller and his wife, Lisa Miller, 50, of Port Lavaca, took over the business in 1989.
 
In a good season, Miller's company sends three to four 18-wheelers per day all across the country with oysters from Lavaca and San Antonio bays.
 
But this season, he said, the ongoing drought is causing a smaller harvest. Since Nov. 1, when the oyster season opened, Miller's Seafood has sent out two trucks per day, a 50 percent drop in production from an average year.
 
"A lot of the oysters are dead," Miller said. "We did get some rain later this summer, but it might have been too little too late for a lot of the oysters."
 
Read the full story at Victoria Advantage>>

Inside the Industry

SeaWeb and Diversified Communications are accepting proposals to present at the SeaWeb Seafood Summit up until Friday, September 30.

Read more ...

Governor Bill Walker has officially requested that the federal government declare a disaster for four Alaska regions hurt by one of the poorest pink salmon returns in decades.

Read more ...
Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
Address
Country
U.S. Canada Other

City
State/Province
Postal/ Zip Code
Email