National Fisherman

PALMER — Changing rivers could affect salmon populations in Alaska, according to researchers at a symposium organized by the Mat-Su Basin Salmon Habitat Partnership.
 
Future changes to flow and temperature — two factors that affect salmon survival — were discussed Nov. 14 at the old Palmer Railroad depot.
 
The waterways that flow into Upper Cook Inlet from around the Matanuska and Susitna valleys contain the most salmon stocks of concern in the state, and much money and time has been spent trying to understand the runs and help restore them through various efforts.
 
Read the full story at Alaska Journal of Commerce>>

National Fisherman Live

Brian Rothschild of the Center for Sustainable Fisheries on revisions to the Magnuson-Stevens Act.

National Fisherman Live: 4/8/14

Inside the Industry

The South Atlantic Fishery Management Council is currently soliciting applicants for open advisory panel seats as well as applications from scientists interested in serving on its Scientific and Statistical Committee.

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The North Carolina Fisheries Association (NCFA), a nonprofit trade association representing commercial fishermen, seafood dealers and processors, recently announced a new leadership team. Incorporated in 1952, its administrative office is in Bayboro, N.C.

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