National Fisherman

JOHANNESBURG — Illegal fishing off Africa - often by ships from wealthy nations like South Korea - costs the continent millions of dollars a year, with poor West African nations among the hardest hit.
 
Activists and environmental organizations are calling for new measures to prevent illegal fishing, including steps to make vessels - and tuna fish - more traceable, at a weeklong meeting of the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas, which began Monday in Cape Town.
 
A single tuna fish can sell for thousands of dollars - one bluefin tuna reportedly sold for $1.76 million at auction this year - and rising demand in Japan, which consumes 80 percent of the world catch, has put world tuna stocks under severe pressure, according to Elizabeth Wilson of the Pew Charitable Trusts' environmental wing.
 
Wilson said in an interview with the Los Angeles Times that fishing quotas in the Atlantic designed to help the devastated tuna stock recover were meaningless without strong measures to prevent widespread illegal fishing. Members of the Pew Charitable Trusts were attending the meeting as observers.
 
"If quotas are set and they're not adhered to, they do no good at all," Wilson said.
 
Read the full story at Bradenton Herald>>

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 9/9/14

In this episode:

Seafood Watch upgrades status of 21 fish species
Calif. bill attacking seafood mislabeling approved
Ballot item would protect Bristol Bay salmon
NOAA closes cod, yellowtail fishing areas
Pacific panel halves young bluefin harvest

National Fisherman Live: 8/26/14

In this episode, National Fisherman Publisher Jerry Fraser talks about his early days dragging for redfish on the Vandal.

Inside the Industry

More than a dozen higher education institutions and federal and local fishery management agencies and organizations in American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and Hawaii have signed a memorandum of understanding aimed at building the capacity of the U.S. Pacific Island territories to manage their fisheries and fishery-related resources.

Read more...

PORTLAND, Maine – The Maine Lobster Marketing Collaborative has appointed Matt Jacobson as its new executive director.
 
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