National Fisherman


Dredged bay mud and sand, once as welcome to communities as a trash dump, may be key to saving Delaware Bay beaches and wetlands from erosion and sea-level rise.
 
This is one concept researchers, advocates and officials are considering as they move ahead with aggressive and creative plans for restoring parts of Cumberland County’s bayshore while ensuring communities most at risk from sea-level rise can better handle flooding and storms.
 
Ideas for helping the bayshore have long floated around, but recovery from Hurricane Sandy — and the increased federal and philanthropic dollars flowing into New Jersey — has effectively put a spotlight on numerous projects and all but guarantees at least a few will move forward.
 
“These are projects that protect the natural habitat, but they also provide for natural resilience,” said Tim Dillingham, executive director of the American Littoral Society, which is leading multiple projects along with The Nature Conservancy.
 
Read the full story at Press of Atlantic City>>

Inside the Industry

The Downeast Salmon Federation has received a major grant from the U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities to ensure and improve the water quality of eastern Maine’s most important rivers, according to the Ellsworth American.

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Louisiana crab fishermen and their catch are feeling the pressure of a downturn in the state economy, and a resulting upturn of people entering the fishery.

“It’s a crazy business right now,” said Pete Gerica, the New Orleans fisherman who now serves as president or the Louisiana Crab Task Force, a legislatively-created board of industry voices that makes recommendations to state government.

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