National Fisherman


WASHINGTON — Recreational and commercial fishing interests are pressing Congress to relax catch limits in the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic, citing increases in fish populations over the past decade.
 
Some of the organizations that help set those limits and several fishermen who must abide by them told lawmakers Thursday the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery and Conservation Management Act needs to be modified. That’s the federal law that governs fishing activity in areas beyond state-regulated waters.
 
“Many stocks of fish are more plentiful today than at any other time in my career,” Robert A. Johnson, a charter boat captain from St. Augustine, told a Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation subcommittee. “Unfortunately, this accomplishment has come at a huge cost to fishermen and coastal communities. Fishing fleets in my area have experienced about a 50-percent decline in recent years.”
 
Read the full story at Marco Island Sun Times>>

Inside the Industry

Legislators from Connecticut and Massachusetts complained about the current “out-of-date allocation formula” in black sea bass, summer flounder and scup fisheries in a letter to the U.S. Department of Commerce earlier this week.

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The Southeast Alaska Fishermen’s Alliance recently announced that the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation has awarded the organization a Hollings Grant to reduce whale entanglements in Alaska salmon fisheries by increasing the use of acoustic whale pingers to minimize entanglements in fishing gear.

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