National Fisherman


WASHINGTON — Recreational and commercial fishing interests are pressing Congress to relax catch limits in the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic, citing increases in fish populations over the past decade.
 
Some of the organizations that help set those limits and several fishermen who must abide by them told lawmakers Thursday the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery and Conservation Management Act needs to be modified. That’s the federal law that governs fishing activity in areas beyond state-regulated waters.
 
“Many stocks of fish are more plentiful today than at any other time in my career,” Robert A. Johnson, a charter boat captain from St. Augustine, told a Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation subcommittee. “Unfortunately, this accomplishment has come at a huge cost to fishermen and coastal communities. Fishing fleets in my area have experienced about a 50-percent decline in recent years.”
 
Read the full story at Marco Island Sun Times>>

Inside the Industry

The Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association released their board of directors election results last week.

The BBRSDA’s member-elected volunteer board provides financial and policy guidance for the association and oversees its management. Through their service, BBRSDA board members help determine the future of one of the world’s most dynamic commercial fisheries.

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Former Massachusetts state fishery scientist Steven Correia received the New England Fishery Management Council’s Janice Plante Award of Excellence for 2016 at its meeting last week.

Correia was employed by the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries for over 30 years.

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