National Fisherman

Using commercial gill nets in Florida waters -- banned for 18 years -- suddenly became legal for nearly a week in early November.
 
No reports their use were seen in Florida Keys waters before the ban was reinstated Nov. 6 by an appeals court ruling, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.
 
"If there were, we didn't hear about it," said Officer Bobby Dube, FWC spokesman for Monroe County. "Now we're back at it" to enforce established rules, he said Tuesday.
 
Current law allows fishermen to have two 500-square-foot nets with 2-inch squares. Fishermen want the squares to be 3 inches. They believe nets with larger mesh sizes (gill nets) can catch target species -- primarily mullet -- while allowing juveniles to escape.
 
For several days after Leon County Circuit Court Judge Jackie Fulford ordered the longstanding net ban lifted in late October because of what she described as a "legal absurdity," FWC officers were prevented by her decision from enforcing the rules.
 
But on Nov. 6, the First District Court of Appeal reinstated a stay on lifting the ban pending further legal review.
 
The Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen's Association joined other state commercial groups to seek status as an intervener in support of changing laws on gill nets.
 
"Nets can be a responsible method of harvest with reasonable limitations in place," said Bill Kelly, the group's executive director. "What the industry is seeking is to have the FWC [board of directors] sit down with fishermen to discuss how to better manage fisheries."
 
"The industry hopes to come to the table with the FWC and interested environmental groups to see if there is common ground to better manage underutilized fisheries like Spanish mackerel."
 
Read the full story at the Florida Keys Keynoter>>

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 11/06/14

In this episode:

NOAA report touts 2013 landings, value increases
Panama fines GM salmon company Aquabounty
Gulf council passes Reef Fish Amendment 40
Maine elver quota cut by 2,000 pounds
Offshore mussel farm would be East Coast’s first

 

Inside the Industry

Fishermen in Western Australia captured astonishing footage this week as a five-meter-long great white shark tried to steal their catch, ramming into the side of their boat.
 
Read more...
EAST SAND ISLAND, Oregon—Alexa Piggott is crawling through a dark, dusty, narrow tunnel on this 62-acre island at the mouth of the Columbia River. On the ground above her head sit thousands of seabirds. Piggott, a crew leader with Bird Research Northwest, is headed for an observation blind from which she'll be able to count them.
 
Read more...
Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
Address
Country
U.S. Canada Other

City
State/Province
Postal/ Zip Code
Email