National Fisherman

ST. MICHAELS, Md. -- It's still dark outside when Guy Spurry and his 19-year-old son Austin begin their day. 
Beneath the darkness of the November sky, the two men drive past the Eastern Shore fishing village of Neavitt, and pull up to a dock where Guy Spurry’s 31-year-old boat, the Voyager, rocks back and forth gently against the salty waves. 
Watermen have been harvesting the seafood enjoyed by Marylanders for centuries. But only time will tell how long the tradition will last. 
“It’s hard enough to make it as a waterman these days, given the fact that so many of the things that they’re harvesting -- like crabs -- the numbers are declining,” said Kate Livie, director of education at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum of St. Michaels. 
Read the full story at Southern Maryland Headline News>>

Inside the Industry

NMFS has awarded 16 grants totaling more than $2.5 million as part of its Bycatch Reduction Engineering Program.

The program supports the development of technological solutions and changes in fishing practices designed to minimize bycatch and aims to to find creative approaches and strategies for reducing bycatch, seabird interactions, and post-release mortality in federally managed fisheries.


Abe Williams, who was elected to the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association board last spring, has been selected as the new president as of September.

Williams fishes the F/V Crimson Fury, and is president of Nuna Resources, a nonprofit that supports sustainable resource development in rural Alaska, including fighting for an international solution to issues raised by the proposed Pebble Mine project.

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