National Fisherman

Fishermen often find themselves at the mercy of conditions that exist well outside of their control: extreme weather, temperature, breeding cycles, fuel prices, dock prices for their catch and so much more. But what if some of those conditions could be predicted not just days but months into the future? Would the fishing industry be better able to adapt?
That's one of the goals behind an interesting experiment at the University of Washington, where the Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean has developed a new system called the JISAO Seasonal Coastal Ocean Prediction of the Ecosystem  or J-SCOPE. The system — currently a prototype — looks at global climate models to anticipate commercial fishing conditions up to six months in the future. J-SCOPE currently looks at five things: chlorophyll levels, sea surface temperatures, sardine populations, oceanic oxygen levels and the California current.
"We're taking the global climate model simulations and applying them to our coastal waters," Nick Bond, a UW research meteorologist, said in a press release. "What's cutting edge is how the tool connects the ocean chemistry and biology."
The prototype system made its first prediction this past January when it warned that the sea waters off the coast of Washington state would experience a period of reduced oxygen (a condition called hypoxia). That prediction came true this past July, and the J-SCOPE system predicts the low-oxygen period will continue through the rest of this year.
"We are excited about the initial results, but there is more to learn and explore about this tool – not only in terms of the science, but also in terms of its application," UW research scientist Samantha Siedlecki said.
Read the full story at the Mother Nature Network>>

Inside the Industry

NMFS has awarded 16 grants totaling more than $2.5 million as part of its Bycatch Reduction Engineering Program.

The program supports the development of technological solutions and changes in fishing practices designed to minimize bycatch and aims to to find creative approaches and strategies for reducing bycatch, seabird interactions, and post-release mortality in federally managed fisheries.


Abe Williams, who was elected to the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association board last spring, has been selected as the new president as of September.

Williams fishes the F/V Crimson Fury, and is president of Nuna Resources, a nonprofit that supports sustainable resource development in rural Alaska, including fighting for an international solution to issues raised by the proposed Pebble Mine project.

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