National Fisherman

Editor’s note: This is the first of a two-part package on tiger shrimp. See Monday’s or go to for the second part on the re-emergence of the wild tiger shrimp in St. Augustine.
Penaeus monodon has a lot of scientific types scratching their heads at its stubborn grasp on survival and worrying about what that will mean in the long run.
The Asian black tiger shrimp has been more of an oddity than a concern to marine researchers over the past 25 years. Sightings were sufficiently rare for the Department of Natural Resources to put out a “wanted poster” on the big crustacean; asking anyone who came across one to report it to a hotline.
The interest in the jumbo shrimp ramped up last week and the attention is focused squarely on St. Augustine.
That’s because the reclusive, rare shrimp showed up here in numbers unheard of until recent weeks. Both the Triton II and Miss Renee shrimp boats came to the docks Tuesday with about 25 pounds each of the tigers mixed in with their normal catch of white shrimp.
Read the full story at St. Augustine Record>>

Inside the Industry

The Center for Coastal Studies recently announced that Owen Nichols, Director of the Center for Coastal Studies’ Marine Fisheries Research Program, has been selected as this year’s recipient of the John Annala Fishery Leadership Award by the Gulf of Maine Research Institute. 

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Cummins  announced the opening of a new Alaska service location on Kodiak Island last week that will serve as a service and support location for commercial marine applications.

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