National Fisherman

Shrimp with no eyes. Shrimp with bulbous tumors on their necks. Crabs with holes in their shells.
That's what fishermen around the Gulf of Mexico are still finding, three years after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.
BP, the oil company responsible for the spill, says it's all natural, according to a report by Al-Jazeera: "BP claims that fish lesions are naturally common, and that before the spill there was documented evidence of lesions in the Gulf of Mexico caused by parasites and other agents."
A Louisiana oysterman who is only operating two of the ten boats in his fleet told Al-Jazeera: "We're seeing crabs with holes in their shells, other seafood deformities. The state of Louisiana oyster season opened on October 15, and we can't find any production out there yet. There is no life out there."
A Hernando Beach seafood dealer said, "Our stone crab harvest has dropped off and not come back; the numbers are way lower. Typically you'll see some good crabbing somewhere along the west coast of Florida, but this last year we've had problems everywhere... We've seen fish with tar balls in their stomachs... I'm in west-central Florida, but fishermen all the way down to Key West are struggling to make it." 
Read the full story at the Broward Palm Beach New Times>>

Inside the Industry

Abe Williams, who was elected to the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association board last spring, has been selected as the new president as of September.

Williams fishes the F/V Crimson Fury, and is president of Nuna Resources, a nonprofit that supports sustainable resource development in rural Alaska, including fighting for an international solution to issues raised by the proposed Pebble Mine project.


The Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi is teaming up with leading shark-tracking nonprofit Ocearch to build the most extensive shark-tagging program in the Gulf of Mexico region.

In October, Ocearch is bringing its unique research vessel, the M/V Ocearch, to the gulf for a multi-species study to generate previously unattainable data on critical shark species, including hammerhead, tiger and mako sharks.

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