National Fisherman

The Massachusetts Senate has approved a $50,000 appropriation that, if also approved by the House, will help fund a state Division of Marine Fisheries plan to stave off further erosion of the state's commercial fishing industry.

The appropriation, while modest, represents the second state effort in less than a week to provide financial assistance directly to commercial fishermen and shore-side businesses related to the fishing industry after years of relative inertia.

Perhaps more importantly, it could represent the first step to a systematic state approach for developing a strategy to help the commercial fishing industry rebound from its current dire position.

On Tuesday, Senate Minority Leader Bruce Tarr announced that he and Majority Whip Mark C. Montigny, D-New Bedford, secured an amendment in the state budget to provide Gloucester with a $75,000 port-recovery grant to help develop a plan to sustain shore-side businesses. New Bedford received a similar grant.

Tarr said Friday that the DMF amendment is the second half to that equation. He likened it to a life-support measure essential to help keep the commercial fishing industry — and its workforce — economically alive long enough for a proper cure to be found.

"My fear is that we're going to see the complete implosion of the industry," Tarr said. "There isn't enough catch being allowed, and the consequences of that could well be our overall ability to harvest fish goes extinct because people can't afford to maintain boats and permits and other things."

The $50,000 appropriation approved by the Senate on Thursday directs the DMF to consider a number of strategies for heading off further collapse following increased closings of specific areas in the Northeast multi-species fishery and drastic federal cuts in allowable catch quotas for cod and other species that have served as staples of the Bay State's commercial fishing fleet.

Read the full story at the Gloucester Daily Times>>

Inside the Industry

NMFS has awarded 16 grants totaling more than $2.5 million as part of its Bycatch Reduction Engineering Program.

The program supports the development of technological solutions and changes in fishing practices designed to minimize bycatch and aims to to find creative approaches and strategies for reducing bycatch, seabird interactions, and post-release mortality in federally managed fisheries.


Abe Williams, who was elected to the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association board last spring, has been selected as the new president as of September.

Williams fishes the F/V Crimson Fury, and is president of Nuna Resources, a nonprofit that supports sustainable resource development in rural Alaska, including fighting for an international solution to issues raised by the proposed Pebble Mine project.

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