National Fisherman

Another step has been taken towards getting Alaska's commercial salmon fisheries recertified as sustainable by the Marine Stewardship Council. Last fall the MSC sustainability certification of Alaska's commercial salmon fisheries was allowed to lapse after most of the major seafood processors that operate in the state pulled their support. However, the Purse Seine Vessel Owners Association stepped up to serve as the client for getting the fisheries recertified.

On Tuesday MSC released a determination and final report that concludes that the fisheries should be re-certified in accordance with the MSC standard. The next step in the process is a 15-day waiting period to see if anybody objects to the determination. MSC issued a notice stressing that this is a determination and not a final certification result. That means that for the time being the fisheries are not yet certified as sustainable by MSC and the MSC label can't yet be used on products made with salmon from Alaska.

The salmon fisheries in Alaska were originally certified as sustainable by MSC in the year 2000 and the fisheries were recertified in 2007. The certification lapsed last year but the fisheries are well on their way to being recertified by MSC. The final determination report finds that 13 of the 14 units of certification within Alaska meet the MSC standards. However, the assessment team is suggesting that the Prince William Sound unit remain in assessment. That's pending further analysis of a multi-year study by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game relating to hatchery and wild salmon interactions and evidence relating to hatchery releases of salmon on the productivity of herring in Prince William Sound.

Read the full story at KDLG>>

Inside the Industry

NMFS has awarded 16 grants totaling more than $2.5 million as part of its Bycatch Reduction Engineering Program.

The program supports the development of technological solutions and changes in fishing practices designed to minimize bycatch and aims to to find creative approaches and strategies for reducing bycatch, seabird interactions, and post-release mortality in federally managed fisheries.


Abe Williams, who was elected to the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association board last spring, has been selected as the new president as of September.

Williams fishes the F/V Crimson Fury, and is president of Nuna Resources, a nonprofit that supports sustainable resource development in rural Alaska, including fighting for an international solution to issues raised by the proposed Pebble Mine project.

Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
U.S. Canada Other

Postal/ Zip Code
© 2015 Diversified Business Communications
Diversified Business Communications