National Fisherman


AUSTRALIA - A scientific paper (Pitman, Haddy and Kloser) has been released assessing the impact of commercial fishing on the reproductive capacity (fecundity) of orange roughy.
 
Data from when exploitation began (1987–1992) is compared with current observations from the eastern Tasmanian stock.
 
Findings show that the ability to reproduce is negatively related to stock size, meaning that as the population of orange roughy declined fecundity per individual increased 41,145 (± 1,363) eggs in 1992 to 59,236 (± 1,047) eggs in 2010.
 
The fecundity per fish has increased by 73 per cent. Modelling this increase based on the 2006 stock assessment showed that the female spawning stock biomass was at 19 per cent of virgin levels, whereas the total reproductive potential was markedly higher and estimated to be at 32 per cent of virgin levels.
 
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Inside the Industry

Ray Hilborn, a University of Washington professor of aquatic and fishery sciences, recently received the 2016 International Fisheries Science Prize at the World Fisheries Congress in Busan, South Korea.

The award was given to Hilborn by the World Council of Fisheries Societies’ International Fisheries Science Prize Committee in recognition of his 40-year career of “highly diversified research and publication in support of global fisheries science and conservation.”

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Legislators from Connecticut and Massachusetts complained about the current “out-of-date allocation formula” in black sea bass, summer flounder and scup fisheries in a letter to the U.S. Department of Commerce earlier this week.

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