National Fisherman


DUTCH HARBOR, ALASKA — For decades, the crab piled up in fishing boats like gold coins hauled from a rich and fertile sea.
 
But the very ocean that nursed these creatures may prove to be this industry's undoing.
 
New research earlier this year shows that Bristol Bay red king crab — the supersized monster that has come to symbolize the fortunes of Alaska's crab fleet — could fall victim to the changing chemistry of the oceans.
 
Barring a hasty reduction in carbon-dioxide emissions — or evidence that the creatures could acclimate to changing sea conditions — a team of scientists fears Alaska's $100 million red king crab fishery could crash in decades to come.
 
That grim possibility also raises alarm about the crab fleet's other major moneymaker, snow crab.
 
"With red king crab, it's all doom and gloom," said Robert Foy, who oversaw the crab research for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in Kodiak, Alaska. "With snow crab, there's so little known we just can't say. But we don't see anything from our experience that's good for any of these crab. Some is just not as bad as others."
 
Read the full story at Anchorage Daily News>>

Inside the Industry

The American Fisheries Society is honoring recently retired Florida Institute of Oceanography director Bill Hogarth with the Carl R. Sullivan Fishery Conservation Award — one of the nation's premier awards in fisheries science - in recognition of his long career and leadership in preserving some of the world's most threatened species, advocating for environmental protections and leading Florida's scientific response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

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The Marine Stewardship Council has appointed Eric Critchlow as the new U.S. Program Director. Critchlow will be based in the MSC US headquarters in Seattle. He is a former vice president of Lusamerica Foods and has over 35 years in the seafood industry.

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