National Fisherman

Japanese, Portuguese, Italian and Mexican immigrants helped make 1950s San Diego the tuna capital of the world. Their dockside fishing operations grew into companies with international reach — Chicken of the Sea and Bumble Bee Tuna. Both are still based here, but the canneries and nets were closed and cinched by the 1980s.
Now, University of San Diego and Scripps Institution of Oceanography researchers are working with fishermen to bring a bit of that maritime history back. They're conducting a year-long study to gauge local demand for dockside fish markets. And they're drawing on the city's immigrants to help once more.
Refugees from coastal East Africa gathered along the harbor Saturday to taste the local catch — seaweed, sardines and sea urchin. Researchers have wrapped them into talks about the dockside fish markets because they'd make a natural customer base; they worked and shopped seaside markets back home.
It's a healthy habit they crave here in San Diego.
"The overwhelming majority said they either eat no fish at all even though they did in their home country or it was very limited and they would go to wholesale warehouses and buy basically what the rest of San Diego does – imported stuff," Scripps researcher Theresa Sinicrope Talley said.
Read the full story at KPBS>>

Inside the Industry

The anti-mining group Salmon Beyond Borders expressed disappointment and dismay last week at Alaska Governor Bill Walker’s announcement that he has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with B.C. Premier Christy Clark.

This came just days after his administration asked members of his newly-formed Transboundary Rivers Citizens Advisory Work Group to provide comment on a Draft Statement of Cooperation associated with Transboundary mining.


NMFS recently released a draft action plan for fish discard and release mortality science, creating a list of actions that they hope can better inform fisheries.

We know that fishermen have to deal with bycatch by discarding or releasing unwanted catch overboard, but there is a data gap regarding how those fish survive.

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