National Fisherman

The Great Lakes Fishery Commission estimates that more than 40 million people in the US and Canada depend on the Great Lakes for food, drinking water and recreation. A state-of-the-art research vessel the "Muskie" is currently making its way through Lake Erie collecting data samples for the US Geological Survey.

The 70-foot long vessel isn't your average boat. It's rigged with advanced sonar and noise reduction technology and high-end microscopes for testing fish samples. Director of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center Russell Strach says the boat has everything you'd find in a lab and more.

"It also has hydroacoustic capability that's a technique where you can essentially penetrate sound into the water and get an image of the fish or schools of fish, we can actually identify to species based on those sound waves and determine general abundance and density," said Strach.

Strach says the USGS researchers aboard the vessel are on Lake Erie to monitor the fish population for evidence of invasive species and environmental changes.

"The scientific data that we're gathering is mostly used to ensure that these species are around for many generations to come. It's for the sustainability. It's so that the states and the province can set harvest restrictions at the right levels, so that commercial fishing remains robust and sport fishing remains healthy," said Strach.

Read the full story at WBFO>>

Inside the Industry

The anti-mining group Salmon Beyond Borders expressed disappointment and dismay last week at Alaska Governor Bill Walker’s announcement that he has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with B.C. Premier Christy Clark.

This came just days after his administration asked members of his newly-formed Transboundary Rivers Citizens Advisory Work Group to provide comment on a Draft Statement of Cooperation associated with Transboundary mining.


NMFS recently released a draft action plan for fish discard and release mortality science, creating a list of actions that they hope can better inform fisheries.

We know that fishermen have to deal with bycatch by discarding or releasing unwanted catch overboard, but there is a data gap regarding how those fish survive.

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