National Fisherman

Turn on a light in your home and imagine it is powered by an old, ripped fishing net.

Hard to imagine?

How about a broken lobster trap? Or a buoy that can no longer float?

Stop imaging. It's really happening.

Through a program called Fishing for Energy, the gear is collected in Gloucester and Rockport and trucked to Covanta's Waste-to-Energy facility in Haverhill, where most of it — and other trash— is converted to energy while metal is collected and recycled.

It's a way to clear the deck, so to speak, for commercial fishermen looking for a cost-free method of disposing of old, unused fishing gear, as well as derelict gear that can pose a threat to marine life.

Read the full story at Gloucester Times>>

Inside the Industry

It’s no secret that fraud is a problem in the seafood industry. Oceana repeatedly touts a mislabeling epidemic. While their method has been criticized, the perception of rampant fraud  has been established.

Read more ...

The Center for Coastal Studies recently announced that Owen Nichols, Director of the Center for Coastal Studies’ Marine Fisheries Research Program, has been selected as this year’s recipient of the John Annala Fishery Leadership Award by the Gulf of Maine Research Institute. 

Read more ...
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