National Fisherman

No one in the lobster world, at least so far, expects a repeat of last summer's crisis, when early molting in Maine flooded the market with an oversupply of soft-shell lobsters. The glut helped drive the boat prices paid to Maine and Canadian lobstermen to historic lows. This summer, the general consensus in the industry is that fishermen up and down the Maine coast are hauling in fewer lobsters overall. But that hasn't done much to improve prices. State and industry officials say this a natural byproduct of a rising supply of lobsters outpacing demand. But frustrated fishermen on both sides of border believe dealers are conspiring to fix prices. Jay Field reports.

In the lobster business, there's one question that no one seems to be able to answer: How does a dealer decide what to pay for lobster coming off a boat on any given day? I put the question to one of the organizers of a joint Canada - U.S. industry conference in Moncton, New Brunswick.

"I don't think anyone really understands how the price of lobster is set," says Bob Bayer, who heads the University of Maine's Lobster Institute.

Maybe one of Maine's 14 lobster processors would have some idea. "You're asking the wrong guy. We're not close enough to that situation to know," says John Hathaway, who runs Shucks Maine Lobster.

Hathaway says he calls around, dealers tell him what the price is and he settles on a deal. "You hear all kinds of stories and rumors and everything else. It is fascinating to figure out, 'How does it start?' I don't know how it starts every day. And when you find out, tell me. I'd like to know."

Read the full story at Maine Public Broadcasting Network>>

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 10/21/14

In this episode:

North Pacific Council adjusts observer program
Fishermen: bluefin fishing best in 10 years
Catch limit raised for Bristol Bay red king crab
Canadian fishermen fight over lobster size rules
River conference addresses Dead Zone cleanup

National Fisherman Live: 10/7/14

In this episode, National Fisherman Publisher Jerry Fraser talks about the 1929 dragger Vandal.

 

Inside the Industry

NOAA and its fellow Natural Resource Damage Assessment trustees in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill have announced the signing of a formal Record of Decision to implement a gulf restoration plan. The 44 projects, totaling an estimated $627 million, will restore barrier islands, shorelines, dunes, underwater grasses and oyster beds.

Read more...

The Golden Gate Salmon Association will host its 4th Annual Marin County Dinner at Marin Catholic High School, 675 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., Kentfield on Friday, Oct 10, with doors opening at 5:30 p.m.

Read more...

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