National Fisherman

No one in the lobster world, at least so far, expects a repeat of last summer's crisis, when early molting in Maine flooded the market with an oversupply of soft-shell lobsters. The glut helped drive the boat prices paid to Maine and Canadian lobstermen to historic lows. This summer, the general consensus in the industry is that fishermen up and down the Maine coast are hauling in fewer lobsters overall. But that hasn't done much to improve prices. State and industry officials say this a natural byproduct of a rising supply of lobsters outpacing demand. But frustrated fishermen on both sides of border believe dealers are conspiring to fix prices. Jay Field reports.

In the lobster business, there's one question that no one seems to be able to answer: How does a dealer decide what to pay for lobster coming off a boat on any given day? I put the question to one of the organizers of a joint Canada - U.S. industry conference in Moncton, New Brunswick.

"I don't think anyone really understands how the price of lobster is set," says Bob Bayer, who heads the University of Maine's Lobster Institute.

Maybe one of Maine's 14 lobster processors would have some idea. "You're asking the wrong guy. We're not close enough to that situation to know," says John Hathaway, who runs Shucks Maine Lobster.

Hathaway says he calls around, dealers tell him what the price is and he settles on a deal. "You hear all kinds of stories and rumors and everything else. It is fascinating to figure out, 'How does it start?' I don't know how it starts every day. And when you find out, tell me. I'd like to know."

Read the full story at Maine Public Broadcasting Network>>

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

It is with great sadness that Furuno USA announced the passing of industry veteran and long-time Furuno employee, Ed Davis, on April 30.
Read more...

Alaska Gov. Bill Walker is required by state statute to appoint someone to the Board of Fisheries by today, Tuesday, May 19. However, his efforts to fill the seat have gone unfulfilled since he took office in January. The seven-member board serves as an in-state fishery management council for fisheries in state waters.

The resignation of Walker’s director of Boards and Commissions, Karen Gillis, fanned the flames of controversy late last week.

Read more...
Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
Address
Country
U.S. Canada Other

City
State/Province
Postal/ Zip Code
Email