National Fisherman

It is part of what makes our state and community distinctive: Alaska's wild salmon runs. They differentiate us from almost all other coastal regions in the world. Fishing is part of our heritage, whether sport, commercial, subsistence or personal use.

The key to sustainability with any natural resource is regulatory stability in terms of business planning and long-term investment. This is a significant problem in Cook Inlet, particularly in the Kenai River, due to salmon allocation issues that have been loudly deliberated for the past several years. With the past few seasons of poor king salmon returns the intensity of the debate has grown. Last year, Kenai River sport fishermen, along with East Side Setnet fishermen, were closed down to preserve king salmon for spawning escapement.

There is no doubt — we are in a period of low abundance of king salmon in several Alaskan rivers. However, the Kenai River king salmon fishery is not at risk or in crisis as high profile sport fishers would like us to believe. Though the king numbers are low, late run post-season analysis by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game showed that the 2012 closures on the Kenai River were unnecessary and were the result of previously misunderstood salmon counting and run timing issues. In fact, late run Kenai River king salmon escapement goals have been met in each of the last twenty-five years and were over escaped in nine of the last ten years.

Are the king salmon smaller? Yes, but for a variety of reasons including an overcapitalized, in-river, guided, professional sport fish industry that has systematically targeted large king salmon. The propensity of trophy kings may not correlate directly to a smaller run.

In order to create long-term solutions to the allocation issue, the Alaska Salmon Alliance (ASA), has a dialogue going with the Mat-Su Fish and Wildlife Commission and the Kenai River Sportfishing Association. We are reaching out to personal-use fishing organizations. ASA is an organization created in 2011 committed to pushing for scientifically-based fishery management, geared toward preserving — for all users — the salmon culture that is unique to Alaska.

Read the full story at the Peninsula Clarion>>

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 12/16/14

In this episode, Bruce Buls, WorkBoat's technical editor, interviews Long Island lobsterman John Aldridge, who survived for 12 hours after falling overboard in the dead of night. Aldridge was the keynote speaker at the 2014 Pacific Marine Expo, which took place Nov. 19-21 in Seattle.

Inside the Industry

NOAA, in consultation with the Department of the Interior, has appointed 10 new members to the Marine Protected Areas Federal Advisory Committee. The 20-member committee is composed of individuals with diverse backgrounds and experience who advise the departments of commerce and the interior on ways to strengthen and connect the nation's MPA programs. The new members join the 10 continuing members appointed in 2012.

Read more...

Fishermen in Western Australia captured astonishing footage this week as a five-meter-long great white shark tried to steal their catch, ramming into the side of their boat.
 
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