National Fisherman

There wasn't much to see when two Italian-born brothers sailed into San Pedro Bay in 1883.

Although there were some shops in the downtown and an established railroad, old photographs of the bay itself show little more than a hilly waterfront with dirt roads dotted with shacks.

But there was one major attraction: the fish. The ocean was teeming with them.

There also was this: The San Pedro-Palos Verdes Peninsula coastline looked an awful lot like Antonio and Vincenzo Dirocco's home port town of Gaeta, Italy.

And so began a family legacy that is one of the Harbor Area's oldest that continues to this day.

Over the next half-century, San Pedro's coastline would be bursting with commercial fishing vessels, its shores rapidly growing with shipping and rail infrastructure, homes, businesses -- and the infamous Beacon Street dives and brothels (along with a jail) that would give San Pedro an infamous reputation by the 1950s.

San Pedro grew to become home to the nation's largest fishing port, with 15 canneries operating on Terminal Island and probably 125 fishing boats docked along the wharf.

But before all of that, the Dirocco brothers - the "r" later became capitalized in America, but it's lowercase in the original spelling -- arrived, searching to build a life in the new world.

Read the full story at The Daily Breeze>>

Inside the Industry

NMFS recently released a draft action plan for fish discard and release mortality science, creating a list of actions that they hope can better inform fisheries.

We know that fishermen have to deal with bycatch by discarding or releasing unwanted catch overboard, but there is a data gap regarding how those fish survive.


A new study has identified a set of features common to all ocean ecosystems that provide a visual diagnosis of the health of the underwater environment coastal communities rely on.

Together, the features detail cumulative effects of threats -- such as overfishing, pollution, and invasive species,  allowing responders to act faster to increase ocean resiliency and sustainability.

Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
U.S. Canada Other

Postal/ Zip Code
© 2015 Diversified Business Communications
Diversified Business Communications