National Fisherman


There wasn't much to see when two Italian-born brothers sailed into San Pedro Bay in 1883.

Although there were some shops in the downtown and an established railroad, old photographs of the bay itself show little more than a hilly waterfront with dirt roads dotted with shacks.

But there was one major attraction: the fish. The ocean was teeming with them.

There also was this: The San Pedro-Palos Verdes Peninsula coastline looked an awful lot like Antonio and Vincenzo Dirocco's home port town of Gaeta, Italy.

And so began a family legacy that is one of the Harbor Area's oldest that continues to this day.

Over the next half-century, San Pedro's coastline would be bursting with commercial fishing vessels, its shores rapidly growing with shipping and rail infrastructure, homes, businesses -- and the infamous Beacon Street dives and brothels (along with a jail) that would give San Pedro an infamous reputation by the 1950s.

San Pedro grew to become home to the nation's largest fishing port, with 15 canneries operating on Terminal Island and probably 125 fishing boats docked along the wharf.

But before all of that, the Dirocco brothers - the "r" later became capitalized in America, but it's lowercase in the original spelling -- arrived, searching to build a life in the new world.

Read the full story at The Daily Breeze>>

Inside the Industry

NOAA recently published a proposed rule that would implement a traceability plan to help combat IUU fishing. The program would seek to trace the origins of imported seafood by setting up reporting and filing procedures for products entering the U.S.

The traceability program would collect data on harvest, landing, and chain of custody of fish and fish products that have been identified as particularly vulnerable to IUU fishing and fraud.

Read more...

The following was released by the Maine Department of Marine Resources on Jan. 22:

The Maine Department of Marine Resources announced an emergency regulation that will support the continued rebuilding effort in Maine’s scallop fishery. The rule, effective January 23, 2016, will close the Muscle Ridge Area near South Thomaston and the Western Penobscot Bay Area.

Read more...
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