National Fisherman


Georgia’s oyster harvesting season ended last month and won’t start up again until the fall, but some Georgia oystermen still are hard at work.
 
That’s because they’ve developed a new, more commercially viable way of oyster-growing.
 
A businessman says it’s all in the way the oysters look.
 
Justin Manley’s commute consists of a 20-minute boat ride. Several times a week, he motors a path through the tidal creeks of Liberty County, through miles of tall, green marsh grass, to his oyster beds in waters leased from the state.
 
“You got St. Catherines Island to the south, Ossabaw to the north and the opening to the ocean straight in the middle,” Manley said.
 
He recently dove into the oyster business because of more than a decade of research at the University of Georgia.
 
The Michigan native worked at the UGA marine lab in Savannah, where he learned about a new way of growing Georgia oysters so they can be sold individually instead of in bags by the bushel.
 
He owns one of three new Georgia businesses that grow oysters using the new method.
 
“For many years, the university and people in the industry were working really hard to figure out how to actually successfully cultivate single oysters,” Manley said. “And they were working, and they were working, and finally — all of a sudden — now there’s a solid method where you can actually do it successfully. And now it’s like, bam, everybody wants to get into it now.”
 
Read the full story at Coastal Courier>>

Inside the Industry

The Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association released their board of directors election results last week.

The BBRSDA’s member-elected volunteer board provides financial and policy guidance for the association and oversees its management. Through their service, BBRSDA board members help determine the future of one of the world’s most dynamic commercial fisheries.

Read more...

Former Massachusetts state fishery scientist Steven Correia received the New England Fishery Management Council’s Janice Plante Award of Excellence for 2016 at its meeting last week.

Correia was employed by the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries for over 30 years.

Read more...
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