National Fisherman

Lobsters attacking and eating one another, especially in captivity, is nothing new, but a University of Maine marine biology student says these days, lobsters are more likely to be killed and eaten by one another than by any other predator.
 
 
In a report by the international climate journalism project Climate Desk, UMaine student Noah Oppenheim says he attaches a waterproof, infrared camera to young lobsters and drops them to the sea floor to see who would come out to eat it. The answer: Lobsters, more than 90 percent of the time.
 
The report says that the warmer waters in recent years, along with overfishing of lobsters’ natural predators, have made lobsters grow larger and produce more offspring. Lobstermen have noticed the difference, as haul sizes have increased and the price of lobster has dropped.
 
Read the full story at Bangor Daily News>>
 

National Fisherman Live

Brian Rothschild of the Center for Sustainable Fisheries on revisions to the Magnuson-Stevens Act.

National Fisherman Live: 4/8/14

Inside the Industry

The South Atlantic Fishery Management Council is currently soliciting applicants for open advisory panel seats as well as applications from scientists interested in serving on its Scientific and Statistical Committee.

Read more...

The North Carolina Fisheries Association (NCFA), a nonprofit trade association representing commercial fishermen, seafood dealers and processors, recently announced a new leadership team. Incorporated in 1952, its administrative office is in Bayboro, N.C.

Read more...

Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
Address
Country
U.S. Canada Other

City
State/Province
Postal/ Zip Code
Email