National Fisherman

The Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion that's one of the hallmarks of the state's Coastal Master Plan could have devastating impacts to fisheries and the way of life in Louisiana's coastal towns, according to Roy Crabtree, regional administrator for the National Marine Fisheries Service.

In a written response to a Solicitation of Views request sent by the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority, Crabtree said the project, commonly called the Myrtle Grove Diversion, will dramatically alter the life cycles of sea life in the area.

"Freshening substantial portions of the basin and localized lowering of water temperature for five months of the year from the MBSD would affect a broad range of fishery species during a variety of life stages and their prey," Crabtree wrote. "Displacement and decreases in shrimp production should be expected to have impacts on valuable species that prey upon shrimp, such as seatrout, red drum and red snapper, as well as to have socio-economic repercussions on commercial fishing and related industries."

Crabtree addressed his letter to Elizabeth Davoli of the CPRA.

He said that although NMFS supports the ultimate goal of coastal restoration in Louisiana, he has serious concerns about the ability of sediment diversions to reach that end.

Read the full story at Times-Picayune>>

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 11/06/14

In this episode:

NOAA report touts 2013 landings, value increases
Panama fines GM salmon company Aquabounty
Gulf council passes Reef Fish Amendment 40
Maine elver quota cut by 2,000 pounds
Offshore mussel farm would be East Coast’s first

 

Inside the Industry

EAST SAND ISLAND, Oregon—Alexa Piggott is crawling through a dark, dusty, narrow tunnel on this 62-acre island at the mouth of the Columbia River. On the ground above her head sit thousands of seabirds. Piggott, a crew leader with Bird Research Northwest, is headed for an observation blind from which she'll be able to count them.
 
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NOAA and its fellow Natural Resource Damage Assessment trustees in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill have announced the signing of a formal Record of Decision to implement a gulf restoration plan. The 44 projects, totaling an estimated $627 million, will restore barrier islands, shorelines, dunes, underwater grasses and oyster beds.

Read more...

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