National Fisherman

When it comes to seafood, Cape Ann and other Massachusetts restaurants and marketers will be facing new truth-in-labeling mandates if a bill filed by a nearby North Shore lawmaker takes hold.

State Rep. Ted Speliotis, D-Danvers, is co-sponsoring legislation that would require restaurants to clearly label what they're selling. At the same time, it would put a stop to the practice of substituting escolar — an especially tasty tropical fish known to cause stomach ailments in some — for white meat tuna.

"Fishing is part of our heritage," Speliotis said. "And this is a way to keep the integrity of the industry."

More specifically, he added, it will require that Pacific cod is not sold as Atlantic cod. The former is shipped from the West Coast frozen while the latter is a traditional New England product likely to be fresh. By putting a premium on the Atlantic cod, he indicated, prices could improve for local fishermen out of Gloucester and elsewhere. Other species intended for scrutiny are Atlantic halibut, grey sole and red snapper.

The bill, also sponsored by Lynn state Rep. Robert Fennell, has now won the approval of the House Public Health Committee. It was initially inspired last year after the appearance of news reporting that incorporated DNA testing to prove that some sushi sold as tuna was actually the much less costly escolar.

"But we've known of this type of problem all along," said Speliotis, who recalled hearing his father tell him "Don't order the scrod, because you don't know what you're getting."

Read the full story at Gloucester Times>>

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National Fisherman Live: 11/06/14

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Maine elver quota cut by 2,000 pounds
Offshore mussel farm would be East Coast’s first

 

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