National Fisherman

The National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's proposal to reopen 3,000 square miles of ocean off the coast of Cape Cod to commercial fishing has pleased almost no one, including the South Shore's commercial fishermen.

"It's not like the closed areas are just a paradise full of fish. This is not a panacea," said Frank Mirarchi, a Scituate fisherman of 51 years.
Last week, NOAA announced a proposed change to its rules that would reopen almost 3,000 square miles of ocean off the coast of Cape Cod that has been closed for almost 20 years to commercial fishing on a seasonal basis.

For Mirarchi, this is too far offshore to have any practical, positive impact on the industry.

"None of the boats in Scituate, Plymouth and Green Harbor go out that far," Mirarchi said.

The regulatory changes would allow greater access to flounder and haddock – among other species – for vessels that do travel that far, said NOAA communications officer Majorie Mooney-Seus.

State environmental groups are also unhappy about the proposal. The Conservation Law Foundation and Earthjustice sued NOAA in May, claiming the agency had skipped a legally required analysis of the effects of reopening the areas.

Read the full story at Patriot Ledger>>

Inside the Industry

The anti-mining group Salmon Beyond Borders expressed disappointment and dismay last week at Alaska Governor Bill Walker’s announcement that he has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with B.C. Premier Christy Clark.

This came just days after his administration asked members of his newly-formed Transboundary Rivers Citizens Advisory Work Group to provide comment on a Draft Statement of Cooperation associated with Transboundary mining.


NMFS recently released a draft action plan for fish discard and release mortality science, creating a list of actions that they hope can better inform fisheries.

We know that fishermen have to deal with bycatch by discarding or releasing unwanted catch overboard, but there is a data gap regarding how those fish survive.

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