National Fisherman


The federal agencies responsible for making Columbia Basin hydroelectric dams safer for salmon say they are doing a good job, helping more young fish survive their migration downstream, and producing higher returns among threatened and endangered runs.

The Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation released a draft evaluation Thursday of their efforts since 2008 to implement the improvements laid out by the NOAA Fisheries Service.

It says improvements have now been made to all the dams on the Snake and Columbia rivers to help young fish survive their downstream migration, and they are on track to meet individual dam survival goals of 96 percent in spring and 93 percent in summer. Most of the 13 runs of salmon and steelhead protected by the Endangered Species Act are returning in greater numbers. More than 2,000 miles of river have been opened to salmon spawning, more water has been devoted to increasing flow in salmon streams, and 3,791 acres of river estuaries have been protected.

Read the full story at the Seattle Post-Intelligencer>>

Inside the Industry

Governor Bill Walker has officially requested that the federal government declare a disaster for four Alaska regions hurt by one of the poorest pink salmon returns in decades.

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The New England Fishery Management Council recently elected Dr. John F. Quinn of Massachusetts and E. F. “Terry” Stockwell III of Maine to serve respectively as chairman and vice chairman in the year ahead. The two have led the Council since 2014 but reversed roles this year. 

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