National Fisherman

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — Gov. John Kitzhaber's effort to move commercial gillnet fishers off the Columbia River took a big step forward in the final hours of Oregon's legislative session this week.

Recreational fishers will find higher prices for licenses to catch salmon and steelhead, along with an exclusion zone at a popular fishing spot near Astoria.

Lawmakers approved a surcharge of up to $9.75 per year to raise money for fisheries enhancement. They also authorized an exclusion zone at the mouth of Youngs Bay, a popular fishing spot near Astoria.

The measure lifts a decades-old ban on seine nets for commercial fishing and allocates $500,000 to mitigate the economic impacts of ending gillnet fishing on the main stem of the Columbia beginning in 2017. It was welcomed by sport-fishing interests and denounced by commercial gillnetters, who have ardently opposed Kitzhaber's effort to get them off the main stem.

"I think it really is a huge step into this century for fishery management," said Liz Hamilton, director of the Northwest Sportfishing Industry Association.

At Kitzhaber's request, the fish and wildlife commissions in Oregon and Washington voted earlier this year to restrict gillnets to side channels like Youngs Bay and release more hatchery fish in those areas to boost the number of salmon returning.

The measure was approved Sunday in the Senate and Monday in the House, and Kitzhaber is expected to sign it. It directs the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission to adopt an exclusion zone at the mouth of Youngs Bay by Feb. 1, 2014. The boundaries are undefined, and the fight over where to set them is likely to be yet another source of tension between the long-feuding commercial and recreational fishers.

The mouth to Youngs Bay is a popular recreational fishing spot known as Buoy 10. The exclusion zone will be reviewed every three years and could be eliminated.

Read the full story at KATU>>

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 10/21/14

In this episode:

North Pacific Council adjusts observer program
Fishermen: bluefin fishing best in 10 years
Catch limit raised for Bristol Bay red king crab
Canadian fishermen fight over lobster size rules
River conference addresses Dead Zone cleanup

National Fisherman Live: 10/7/14

In this episode, National Fisherman Publisher Jerry Fraser talks about the 1929 dragger Vandal.

 

Inside the Industry

NOAA and its fellow Natural Resource Damage Assessment trustees in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill have announced the signing of a formal Record of Decision to implement a gulf restoration plan. The 44 projects, totaling an estimated $627 million, will restore barrier islands, shorelines, dunes, underwater grasses and oyster beds.

Read more...

The Golden Gate Salmon Association will host its 4th Annual Marin County Dinner at Marin Catholic High School, 675 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., Kentfield on Friday, Oct 10, with doors opening at 5:30 p.m.

Read more...

Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
Address
Country
U.S. Canada Other

City
State/Province
Postal/ Zip Code
Email