National Fisherman

WASHINGTON -- Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, this week called for the release of Pebble Partnership's detailed plans and a timeline for developing the Pebble Mine site near the headwaters of Bristol Bay in Southwest Alaska.

In a letter to the leaders of Pebble Partnership released Tuesday, Murkowski said the group's inaction in the permitting process continues to cause anxiety and confusion in the Alaskan communities near the site, located nearly 200 miles southwest of Anchorage on one of the largest salmon runs in the world.

"Alaskans need some certainty and clarity over how the Pebble Partnership intends to proceed," Murkowski said in a news release. "I understand the complexity of a project like this, and I appreciate the investments that have been made in Alaska already. But a reliable timeline has been missing and I hope that the companies will provide one soon."

John Shively, chief executive officer of Pebble Partnership, said he understands the senator's concern but that rushing the proceedings isn't in the best interest of the company's stakeholders.

"Development of Pebble is a complex undertaking and getting it right takes time," Shively said in a statement. "We will share a plan with Alaskans when it is ready and meets the high standards we have set for development at Pebble."

Shively said he plans to contact Murkowski to discuss the proposed copper and gold mine project that has been mired in the permitting process for nearly a decade.

Read the full story at the Miami Herald>>

Inside the Industry

NMFS recently released a draft action plan for fish discard and release mortality science, creating a list of actions that they hope can better inform fisheries.

We know that fishermen have to deal with bycatch by discarding or releasing unwanted catch overboard, but there is a data gap regarding how those fish survive.


A new study has identified a set of features common to all ocean ecosystems that provide a visual diagnosis of the health of the underwater environment coastal communities rely on.

Together, the features detail cumulative effects of threats -- such as overfishing, pollution, and invasive species,  allowing responders to act faster to increase ocean resiliency and sustainability.

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