National Fisherman

It's probably the biggest fight in recent history between environmentalists and the natural-resources industry. And if you've ever eaten salmon, you might have a stake in the outcome.
 
June 30 marked the deadline for filing public comments with the Environmental Protection Agency on the development of a project known as Pebble Mine in southwest Alaska's Bristol Bay region. As of last week, more than 500,000 comments had been recorded.
 
On one side of the fight is the largest undeveloped copper deposit (along with plenty of gold and molybdenum) in the world. Estimates vary on how valuable the minerals are, but they might be worth as much as $300 billion. A group of companies lead by London-based Anglo American Plc wants to develop the mine over the next several decades. It undoubtedly would be an economic boon to an area with a dearth of good jobs and yield billions of dollars over the mine's lifespan in taxes for Alaska's treasury.
 
On the other side is the most productive salmon fishery in the world and a region that, with about 7,500 residents, is one of the most pristine in the world. The commercial and recreational fishery generates as much as $500 million a year for the state economy and provides subsistence living for many of the tribal members in the area.
 
The mining group, which describes the EPA's evaluations of the project as flawed and biased, says it can develop the mine and leave the salmon fishery intact. Opponents say this isn't plausible even under the best circumstances, meaning no industrial accidents.
 
Because the ore is of relatively low grade, huge amounts of material would have to be extracted. Developing the mine, which would encompass an area two-thirds the size of Manhattan, would obliterate dozens of miles of salmon-spawning streams and rivers that overlay the deposit and flow into Bristol Bay, where millions of salmon gather and are harvested every year. Billions of tons of waste material, mostly minerals that produce sulfuric acid and other toxins upon contact with air and water, would be stored in gigantic lakes filling two valleys behind man-made dams, some of them 700-feet high and several miles long. Copper, which would be dissolved by the acid, is among the most lethal substances for salmon. Even microscopic amounts are believed to disrupt the ability of a salmon to return to its natal stream to reproduce.
 
The EPA says the mine waste probably would have to sit there for decades or centuries, possibly "in perpetuity." This poses any number of problems. For one, the EPA has concluded that mining is the most-polluting industry there is. And it may not be realistic to think the mining group will spend the money needed to maintain the waste impoundments once the mine closes.
 
Read the full story at Bloomberg>>

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 9/9/14

In this episode:

Seafood Watch upgrades status of 21 fish species
Calif. bill attacking seafood mislabeling approved
Ballot item would protect Bristol Bay salmon
NOAA closes cod, yellowtail fishing areas
Pacific panel halves young bluefin harvest

National Fisherman Live: 8/26/14

In this episode, National Fisherman Publisher Jerry Fraser talks about his early days dragging for redfish on the Vandal.

Inside the Industry

More than a dozen higher education institutions and federal and local fishery management agencies and organizations in American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and Hawaii have signed a memorandum of understanding aimed at building the capacity of the U.S. Pacific Island territories to manage their fisheries and fishery-related resources.

Read more...

PORTLAND, Maine – The Maine Lobster Marketing Collaborative has appointed Matt Jacobson as its new executive director.
 
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