National Fisherman

Three foreign mining executives walk into a bar and say to anyone who’ll listen, 'We want to dig one of the largest open pit mines on Earth in the middle of Alaska’s world class wild salmon fishery. We promise not to hurt the fishery or interfere with the 22,000 jobs and $1.5 billion it generates each year. And one more thing: We’re going to leave 10 billion tons of contaminated waste in a pond held by earthen dams taller than the Three Gorges Dam in China — forever.'

A good joke? Not a joke at all. In fact, this is the scheme that London-based Anglo-American and Rio Tinto, with their Canadian partner Northern Dynasty Minerals -- called the Pebble Partnership -- have in mind for southwestern Alaska -- a gold and copper mine two miles wide and a mile deep at the headwaters of the incomparable Bristol Bay wild salmon fishery.

Although this week, Pebble’s CEO John Shively and his small army of lobbyists were in Washington trying to persuade White House and members of Congress otherwise, Pebble Mine is quite simply one of the most reckless projects anywhere in the world today. Even major jewelers, led by Tiffany & Co., have opposed it -- because eventually it will contaminate the fishery and the global food source it provides, poison the people, communities, and economy of the region, and destroy one of the world’s vast, pristine wilderness areas.

But it can be stopped — now. Nine Alaskan tribes have petitioned the EPA to pre-empt the Pebble Mine by prohibiting or restricting large-scale mining in the Bristol Bay headwaters. Their request is supported by a wide array of stakeholders in the region, including commercial and recreational fishermen, businessmen, developers, hunters, conservationists, and over 80 percent of the Alaska Natives in the region.

Read the full story at the Alaska Dispatch>>

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

Alaska Gov. Bill Walker is required by state statute to appoint someone to the Board of Fisheries by today, Tuesday, May 19. However, his efforts to fill the seat have gone unfulfilled since he took office in January. The seven-member board serves as an in-state fishery management council for fisheries in state waters.

The resignation of Walker’s director of Boards and Commissions, Karen Gillis, fanned the flames of controversy late last week.

Read more...

Keith Decker, president and COO of High Liner Foods, will take over for the outgoing CEO, Harry Demone, who will assume the role as chairman of the board of directors. The Lunenburg, Nova Scotia-based seafood supplier boasts sales in excess of $310 million (American) for the first quarter of the year.

Read more...
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