National Fisherman

DAUPHIN ISLAND, Ala. (WPMI) Scientists are predicting a massive, possibly record-breaking, dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico this summer.

A dead zone is when there isn't enough oxygen in the water to support fish and other aquatic life.

Flooding in the Midwest is pumping lots of fresh water and fertilizer from farms down the Mississippi River and into the Gulf, which could create a dead zone the size of New Jersey.

Alabama is on the eastern fringe of the predicted dead zone, while Louisiana is right in the middle of it.

University of South Alabama professor and marine scientist Dr. Sean Powers says if the prediction comes true and the dead zone reaches Alabama's waters, the main concern is shrimp.

"Fisherman will go to a spot, and all of a sudden spot where they catch a lot of fish at, they won't catch any fish," Powers said, "That's because the fish swim out of the dead zone."

Read the full story at WPMI-TV>>

Inside the Industry

The Center for Coastal Studies recently announced that Owen Nichols, Director of the Center for Coastal Studies’ Marine Fisheries Research Program, has been selected as this year’s recipient of the John Annala Fishery Leadership Award by the Gulf of Maine Research Institute. 

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Cummins  announced the opening of a new Alaska service location on Kodiak Island last week that will serve as a service and support location for commercial marine applications.

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