National Fisherman


LIKE DINERS, fishermen love cod. For centuries, the fish has been a symbol of Massachusetts and New England. Cod is "the king of all groundfish — people demand it," declared Angela Sanfilippo, of the Massachusetts Fishing Partnership, in a Globe interview. But the fish itself is so depleted that fishermen last year could only muster 60 percent of their government-approved quota for Gulf of Maine cod. And there is no scientific evidence that the fish, especially the stocks closer to shore, are rebounding in a way that justifies a major relaxation of catch limits.

But that hasn't stopped Attorney General Martha Coakley from joining the loud chorus of condemnation for federal fishing regulators by suing the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Coakley contends that the dramatic cuts in allowable levels of Gulf of Maine cod fishing that took effect a month ago are a "death sentence" for the Massachusetts groundfish fleet, with federal regulators displaying a "callous disregard" for the impact on fishing families.

Coakley's lament echoes that of the Massachusetts congressional delegation, which reflexively treats NOAA as a whipping post. Obviously, political leaders see little upside in defending the federal government, and they represent the interests of local fishermen, who feel greatly burdened by the federal limits. If Coakley's suit prompts constructive discussions between the government and fishermen on transitioning from cod to the more abundant redfish, white hake, or pollock, it could be a helpful addition to the debate over fishing limits. But Coakley's decision also has more destructive potential — both in unfairly reinforcing perceptions of the federal government as an enemy of fishermen and, if she is successful, in depleting the cod stock to the point where it all but ceases to exist.

Red the full story at Boston Globe>>

Inside the Industry

The American Fisheries Society is honoring recently retired Florida Institute of Oceanography director Bill Hogarth with the Carl R. Sullivan Fishery Conservation Award — one of the nation's premier awards in fisheries science - in recognition of his long career and leadership in preserving some of the world's most threatened species, advocating for environmental protections and leading Florida's scientific response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

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The Marine Stewardship Council has appointed Eric Critchlow as the new U.S. Program Director. Critchlow will be based in the MSC US headquarters in Seattle. He is a former vice president of Lusamerica Foods and has over 35 years in the seafood industry.

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