National Fisherman

LIKE DINERS, fishermen love cod. For centuries, the fish has been a symbol of Massachusetts and New England. Cod is "the king of all groundfish — people demand it," declared Angela Sanfilippo, of the Massachusetts Fishing Partnership, in a Globe interview. But the fish itself is so depleted that fishermen last year could only muster 60 percent of their government-approved quota for Gulf of Maine cod. And there is no scientific evidence that the fish, especially the stocks closer to shore, are rebounding in a way that justifies a major relaxation of catch limits.

But that hasn't stopped Attorney General Martha Coakley from joining the loud chorus of condemnation for federal fishing regulators by suing the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Coakley contends that the dramatic cuts in allowable levels of Gulf of Maine cod fishing that took effect a month ago are a "death sentence" for the Massachusetts groundfish fleet, with federal regulators displaying a "callous disregard" for the impact on fishing families.

Coakley's lament echoes that of the Massachusetts congressional delegation, which reflexively treats NOAA as a whipping post. Obviously, political leaders see little upside in defending the federal government, and they represent the interests of local fishermen, who feel greatly burdened by the federal limits. If Coakley's suit prompts constructive discussions between the government and fishermen on transitioning from cod to the more abundant redfish, white hake, or pollock, it could be a helpful addition to the debate over fishing limits. But Coakley's decision also has more destructive potential — both in unfairly reinforcing perceptions of the federal government as an enemy of fishermen and, if she is successful, in depleting the cod stock to the point where it all but ceases to exist.

Red the full story at Boston Globe>>

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

SeaShare, a non-profit organization that facilitates donations of seafood to feed the hungry, announced on Wednesday, July 29 that it had partnered up with Alaska seafood companies, freight companies and the Coast Guard, to coordinate the donation and delivery of 21,000 pounds of halibut to remote villages in western Alaska. 

On Wednesday, the Coast Guard loaded 21,000 pounds of donated halibut on its C130 airplane in Kodiak and made the 634-mile flight to Nome.

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The New England Fishery Management Council  is soliciting applications for seats on the Northeast Trawl Survey Advisory Panel and the deadline to apply is July 31 at 5:00 p.m.

The panel will consist of 16 members including members of the councils and the Atlantic States Fishery Commission, industry experts, non-federal scientists and Northeast Fisheries Science Center scientists. Panel members are expected to serve for three years.

Read more...
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