National Fisherman


About a month ago, I got one of those cold calls at the office that make you glad to answer the phone.

It was from Leo Lovel — owner of Spring Creek Restaurant in Wakulla County and author of the marvelous "Spring Creek Chronicles" — inviting me down to eat some oysters. Not just any oysters, mind you, his oysters, ones grown in cages from tiny seeds right there in Alligator Harbor by him and his sons, Ben and Clay.

"They are snow white on the inside and so salty, they will burn your lips," Leo told me.

Then he hit me with this: "This could be the rebirth of the seafood industry in North Florida."

If you read my Sunday story about the Lovels' oyster farming effort, you'll read those quotes again. The first one is just too good to not repeat. The second one, it turns out talking to aquaculture folks, may just be true.

Read the full story at Tallahassee Democrat>>

Inside the Industry

Fishermen throughout the Gulf of Mexico are praising Louisiana officials for a series of strong decisions last week that have broken the deadlock of red snapper management in the Gulf of Mexico.

Read more...

According to the Portland Press Herald, the Maine Seaweed Festival has been canceled this year due to a rift between the event’s organizers and seaweed harvesters.

Read more...
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