National Fisherman

Maria Saarinen is a Program Director from Livia College in Finland. One day, she conducted on Internet search on Great Lakes commercial fisheries after Finnish commercial fishers expressed an interest in learning how lake whitefish and yellow perch are harvested in the Great Lakes. During her online research, Saarinen came across Michigan Sea Grant and Michigan State University Extension educator, Ron Kinnunen— whose last name is Finnish— and she contacted him. Between them, they arranged for a delegation from Finland to visit Lake Huron to learn about the Great Lakes commercial fishing industry. Members of the delegation included commercial fishers, fisheries scientist, and economic development experts.

During the first day of their visit to the Great Lakes, the Finnish delegates attended a seminar on issues in the Great Lakes fisheries based upon interests expressed by the Finns. Michigan Department of Natural Resources scientists, Jim Johnson and Dave Feilder, of the Alpena Michigan Department of Natural Resources Fisheries Field Station gave an overview of the Michigan-licensed commercial fisheries of central Lake Huron and on cormorant management in the Great Lakes, respectively. The Finns fish for a different species of whitefish in their country and have the same problem with cormorants. Additionally, Michigan Sea Grant made a presentation to the delegation on the Great Lakes whitefish marketing project and seafood HACCP. The Finns then visited the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service office in Alpena to learn about the role of that agency in the Great Lakes. The first day then ended with a visit to the NOAA Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary and Besser Museum where Brandon Schroeder (Northeast Michigan Sea Grant Educator) discussed his fisheries history-related efforts with those organizations.

The Finnish delegation visited with John Gauthier and Tom Spaulding of Gauthier and Spaulding Fisheries, who are experienced trap net fishermen and who produce a high quality whitefish product that is sold under the Legends of the Lakes brand. The delegation witnessed a demonstration on the efficiency of trap nets for targeting lake whitefish in Northern Lake Huron. The fish are brought onboard, alive, and iced immediately to maintain their high quality as a food source. From this demonstration, the visiting fishermen determined the use of trap nets in their fishery would be beneficial after they master that fishing technique. Trap netting could also help the Finns to save an extremely rare species of seal (that lives in inland lakes also fished in Finland) as they can be killed in gill nets. Switching to trap nets while fishing in these types of waters could save the livelihood of the commercial fishermen as well as help save the rare seals.

Read the full story at MSU Extension>>

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 11/06/14

In this episode:

NOAA report touts 2013 landings, value increases
Panama fines GM salmon company Aquabounty
Gulf council passes Reef Fish Amendment 40
Maine elver quota cut by 2,000 pounds
Offshore mussel farm would be East Coast’s first

 

Inside the Industry

Fishermen in Western Australia captured astonishing footage this week as a five-meter-long great white shark tried to steal their catch, ramming into the side of their boat.
 
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EAST SAND ISLAND, Oregon—Alexa Piggott is crawling through a dark, dusty, narrow tunnel on this 62-acre island at the mouth of the Columbia River. On the ground above her head sit thousands of seabirds. Piggott, a crew leader with Bird Research Northwest, is headed for an observation blind from which she'll be able to count them.
 
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