National Fisherman


Grab the skewer and stoke the grill. Shrimp start coming in again today.

The commercial trawling season is scheduled to open at 8 a.m., which means at least some quantities of the tasty local catch should arrive at the docks by evening. A S.C. Department of Natural Resources biologist said sample trawls brought in a fair quantity and some good-sized shrimp.

"Certainly we've seen some big shrimp. We're there. I think we had a good spawn in the last moon phase. Let 'em rip," said biologist Larry DeLancey.

As recently as a few weeks ago, the opening was expected to be delayed into June, because of stubbornly cooler waters than usual. Shrimp need relatively warmer water to grow.

Tommy Edwards, a Shem Creek shrimper who works from the dock behind The Wreck of the Richard and Charlene restaurant, prepped his boat Wednesday with modest expectations. But he does figure to bring back a catch, he said.

"We're not looking for much. We figure we'll be getting a little bit. We'll give it our best shot," he said.

Water temperature is one of the biggest factors in the spring white shrimp crop. The state usually opens the season from mid to late May. Last year's dramatically warm winter produced a spring crop that grew so big so fast, the season was opened in mid April. In 2011, cold water delayed the opening well into June.

Read the full story at the Post and Courier>>

Inside the Industry

NOAA recently published a proposed rule that would implement a traceability plan to help combat IUU fishing. The program would seek to trace the origins of imported seafood by setting up reporting and filing procedures for products entering the U.S.

The traceability program would collect data on harvest, landing, and chain of custody of fish and fish products that have been identified as particularly vulnerable to IUU fishing and fraud.

Read more...

The following was released by the Maine Department of Marine Resources on Jan. 22:

The Maine Department of Marine Resources announced an emergency regulation that will support the continued rebuilding effort in Maine’s scallop fishery. The rule, effective January 23, 2016, will close the Muscle Ridge Area near South Thomaston and the Western Penobscot Bay Area.

Read more...
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