National Fisherman


NEW BEDFORD — The environmental group Oceana Inc. filed suit against Northeast fishing regulators Tuesday, accusing them of putting too few monitors on fishing boats to accurately understand what is going on, endangering the fish.

Monitors have been a sore point in the dealings between fishermen and NOAA Fisheries. They are expensive, several hundred dollars per day, and often inexperienced at both counting fish and being on a fishing boat in the open sea.

But the Magnuson-Stevens Act requires the monitors so the National Marine Fisheries Service can make certain that boats aren't misreporting the "bycatch" that is discarded.

Gib Brogan, Oceana's representative in Boston, said fishermen fish differently when monitors are on board, yet only 22 percent of boats in the groundfish fleet have them.

Read the full story at Standard-Times>>

Inside the Industry

Legislators from Connecticut and Massachusetts complained about the current “out-of-date allocation formula” in black sea bass, summer flounder and scup fisheries in a letter to the U.S. Department of Commerce earlier this week.

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The Southeast Alaska Fishermen’s Alliance recently announced that the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation has awarded the organization a Hollings Grant to reduce whale entanglements in Alaska salmon fisheries by increasing the use of acoustic whale pingers to minimize entanglements in fishing gear.

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