National Fisherman

The Clatsop County Democrats recently passed a resolution to support the Environmental Protection Agency's Bristol Bay Watershed Assessment, which documents destructive impacts and further risks from the contentious plans to build North America's largest open-pit mine in Bristol Bay, Alaska. Clatsop County is home to more than one-third of Oregon's 2,100 Bristol Bay commercial fishermen, more than any other county in the state.

"The Bristol Bay commercial salmon fishery is critical to our family's livelihood and to thousands of other fishermen across the United States," said Randy Wall, a commercial fishermen on the Brown Bear fishing vessel. "My family has commercial fished for generations and we take pride in providing Bristol Bay salmon to people all over the world.

"This is one the of last remaining sustainable sources of salmon left on earth and the Pebble Mine could destroy it forever."

The resolution acknowledges the economic threat of building a large-scale open pit mine in Bristol Bay where the wild sockeye salmon fishery is an economic powerhouse that supports 14,000 jobs. The fishery generates $17 million in income for Oregon residents.

The resolution calls the Pebble Mine proposal "an unreasonable and unacceptable threat to the economic livelihoods of Clatsop County commercial fishermen who operate in Bristol Bay, due to established science that demonstrates the incompatibility of open-pit mining operations in salmon spawning habitat."

According to the EPA's updated assessment, which was released April 26, the proposed Pebble Mine in the headwaters of Bristol Bay could destroy up to 87 miles of salmon streams and up to 4,800 acres of salmon habitat. The mine would unearth and store up to 10 billion tons of toxic waste "in perpetuity" behind massive earthen dams in a seismically active region. The Bristol Bay salmon runs account for about half the sockeye salmon supply in the world.

Read the full story at the Daily Astorian>>

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 10/21/14

In this episode:

North Pacific Council adjusts observer program
Fishermen: bluefin fishing best in 10 years
Catch limit raised for Bristol Bay red king crab
Canadian fishermen fight over lobster size rules
River conference addresses Dead Zone cleanup

National Fisherman Live: 10/7/14

In this episode, National Fisherman Publisher Jerry Fraser talks about the 1929 dragger Vandal.

 

Inside the Industry

NOAA and its fellow Natural Resource Damage Assessment trustees in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill have announced the signing of a formal Record of Decision to implement a gulf restoration plan. The 44 projects, totaling an estimated $627 million, will restore barrier islands, shorelines, dunes, underwater grasses and oyster beds.

Read more...

The Golden Gate Salmon Association will host its 4th Annual Marin County Dinner at Marin Catholic High School, 675 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., Kentfield on Friday, Oct 10, with doors opening at 5:30 p.m.

Read more...

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