National Fisherman

The Clatsop County Democrats recently passed a resolution to support the Environmental Protection Agency's Bristol Bay Watershed Assessment, which documents destructive impacts and further risks from the contentious plans to build North America's largest open-pit mine in Bristol Bay, Alaska. Clatsop County is home to more than one-third of Oregon's 2,100 Bristol Bay commercial fishermen, more than any other county in the state.

"The Bristol Bay commercial salmon fishery is critical to our family's livelihood and to thousands of other fishermen across the United States," said Randy Wall, a commercial fishermen on the Brown Bear fishing vessel. "My family has commercial fished for generations and we take pride in providing Bristol Bay salmon to people all over the world.

"This is one the of last remaining sustainable sources of salmon left on earth and the Pebble Mine could destroy it forever."

The resolution acknowledges the economic threat of building a large-scale open pit mine in Bristol Bay where the wild sockeye salmon fishery is an economic powerhouse that supports 14,000 jobs. The fishery generates $17 million in income for Oregon residents.

The resolution calls the Pebble Mine proposal "an unreasonable and unacceptable threat to the economic livelihoods of Clatsop County commercial fishermen who operate in Bristol Bay, due to established science that demonstrates the incompatibility of open-pit mining operations in salmon spawning habitat."

According to the EPA's updated assessment, which was released April 26, the proposed Pebble Mine in the headwaters of Bristol Bay could destroy up to 87 miles of salmon streams and up to 4,800 acres of salmon habitat. The mine would unearth and store up to 10 billion tons of toxic waste "in perpetuity" behind massive earthen dams in a seismically active region. The Bristol Bay salmon runs account for about half the sockeye salmon supply in the world.

Read the full story at the Daily Astorian>>

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

Alaska Gov. Bill Walker is required by state statute to appoint someone to the Board of Fisheries by today, Tuesday, May 19. However, his efforts to fill the seat have gone unfulfilled since he took office in January. The seven-member board serves as an in-state fishery management council for fisheries in state waters.

The resignation of Walker’s director of Boards and Commissions, Karen Gillis, fanned the flames of controversy late last week.

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Keith Decker, president and COO of High Liner Foods, will take over for the outgoing CEO, Harry Demone, who will assume the role as chairman of the board of directors. The Lunenburg, Nova Scotia-based seafood supplier boasts sales in excess of $310 million (American) for the first quarter of the year.

Read more...
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