National Fisherman

FAIRFIELD -- With their spiky, armor-plated shells, they look like miniature tanks mounting a surprise invasion on local beaches -- except they have been at it for nearly a half-billion years.

But the American horseshoe crab, the homely, humble distant relative of ancient trilobites, has fallen on hard times. They're harvested for bait, their blood is collected for medical science, and their numbers are dwindling in places along the Eastern Seaboard, as well as in Asia.

Sacred Heart University, which for years has studied the horseshoe crabs of Long Island Sound, has formed a partnership with Mystic Aquarium's research arm to better understand the stresses facing the living fossils.

Read the full story at Stamford Advocate>>

Inside the Industry

NMFS recently released a draft action plan for fish discard and release mortality science, creating a list of actions that they hope can better inform fisheries.

We know that fishermen have to deal with bycatch by discarding or releasing unwanted catch overboard, but there is a data gap regarding how those fish survive.


A new study has identified a set of features common to all ocean ecosystems that provide a visual diagnosis of the health of the underwater environment coastal communities rely on.

Together, the features detail cumulative effects of threats -- such as overfishing, pollution, and invasive species,  allowing responders to act faster to increase ocean resiliency and sustainability.

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