National Fisherman

Brian Marder, of Marder Trawling on Hassey Street in New Bedford, said he cringed when he read the quote from a UMass student regarding the edibility of dogfish.

"I only know about these spe­cies because I go deep-sea fish­ing," said Riley Jones, a freshman medical laboratory science major at UMass Dartmouth, "but we never keep dogfish because we were told they're inedible. I wasn't even aware you could cook them."

Well, Jones sampled the dogfish at UMass on Tuesday, so now he knows: Indeed, you can cook them and you can eat and enjoy them.

The UMass taste test included three other species only marginally targeted by New Bedford groundfishermen: hake, pollock and redfish, all of which are plentiful and underfished in local waters.

The taste test is part of a push to find better choices for the beleaguered groundfishing fleet as their traditional catches such as cod and yellowtail flounder are regulated right out of their trawls.

The coordination among UMass, its food service vendor Chartwells, Plymouth-based Open Ocean Trading and local fishermen offers great potential: for more fish to be caught and sold, better prices for Chartwells and UMass, and fresher fish being eaten by UMass students here and across the state.

It seems like the perfect solution.

But it isn't.

Marder catches and sells dogfish — "99.999 percent" goes to overseas markets, he says — and would be happy to be selling more than .001 percent here.

Read the full story at the New Bedford Standard Times>>

Inside the Industry

Abe Williams, who was elected to the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association board last spring, has been selected as the new president as of September.

Williams fishes the F/V Crimson Fury, and is president of Nuna Resources, a nonprofit that supports sustainable resource development in rural Alaska, including fighting for an international solution to issues raised by the proposed Pebble Mine project.


The Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi is teaming up with leading shark-tracking nonprofit Ocearch to build the most extensive shark-tagging program in the Gulf of Mexico region.

In October, Ocearch is bringing its unique research vessel, the M/V Ocearch, to the gulf for a multi-species study to generate previously unattainable data on critical shark species, including hammerhead, tiger and mako sharks.

Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
U.S. Canada Other

Postal/ Zip Code
© 2015 Diversified Business Communications
Diversified Business Communications