National Fisherman

BALTIMORE — Maryland lawmakers have joined a handful of states in passing a ban on shark fin sales with a slight twist, crafting a measure that is supported by conservationists as well as a commercial fishing group.

Environmental groups have long pushed for shark fin bans, noting shark populations are being drastically reduced by the practice of finning. The practice involves leaving sharks to die after having their fins cut off for the lucrative trade in the Asian delicacy.

One trade group, however, argued that California’s more extensive ban hurts fishermen who catch spiny dogfish, a small shark also used for fish and chips that is sustainably harvested. The Maryland law exempts the shark species along with several others. Maryland’s law was supported by the Sustainable Fisheries Association, a Massachusetts nonprofit founded by four seafood processors.

John Whiteside, an attorney for the association, said other states should consider Maryland’s law as a model.

“This is the way to approach it. You account for the fisheries management plans that are in place and you work with federal and state regulatory agencies to craft something that doesn’t create an inherent conflict,” Whiteside said.

While fins account for 3 percent of a spiny dogfish, they represent nearly 40 percent of profits from sales, the association said.

In a posting to the Federal Register on a proposed rule stemming from the federal Shark Conservation Act, the National Marine Fisheries Service noted Thursday that state shark fin laws have the potential to undermine management of federal shark fisheries.

“Although state shark fin laws are also intended to conserve sharks, they may not unduly interfere with the conservation and management of federal fisheries,” the service said in its posting, which seeks comment on the proposed rule.

Read the full story at the Washington Post>>

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

The Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council has scheduled a series of scoping hearings to gather public input for a proposed action to protect unmanaged forage species.

The proposed action would consider a prohibition on the development of new, or expansion of existing, directed fisheries on unmanaged forage species in the Mid-Atlantic until adequate scientific information is available to promote ecosystem sustainability.

Read more...

The National Marine Educators Association has partnered with NOAA this year to offer all NMEA 2015 conference attendees an educational session on how free NOAA data can add functionality to navigation systems and maritime apps.

Session topics include nautical charts, tides and currents, seafloor data, buoy networking and weather, among others.

Read more...
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