National Fisherman


Last summer, Alaska setnetter Chris Brandt sat on an empty Cook Inlet beach that normally she'd be working, setting her nets in the murky waters of the east side of Cook Inlet in hopes of scooping up thousands of sockeye salmon. But inevitably, there was a chance that swimming among the millions of sockeye headed to Alaska rivers, Brandt's net would snag one of the chinook salmon so prized by anglers.

And last summer, very few of those chinooks showed up. No one is exactly sure why. But in an effort to protect those precious kings -- the largest and most prized of all of salmon -- fisheries managers shut down the setnetters. Those kings that might wind up in commercial nets -- a couple hundred at most -- needed to be spared to ensure that enough of them reached their spawning grounds to ensure strong future runs. That was particularly important to sport fishermen, who also faced harsh restrictions and closures. With different user groups demanding the burden of conservation be shared, fishing all but stalled on and around the Kenai River.

But the setnet shutdown cut particularly deep among certain commercial fishermen on the Kenai Peninsula.
Setnet disaster, driftnet boom

On the Kenai, commercial fishermen are grouped into two distinct groups -- setnetters and driftnetters. Setnetters fish near shore, setting their nets from skiffs. More mobile driftnetters work the middle of the inlet, where their nets float near the top of the water.

In 2010, the Alaska Board of Fisheries established that the two groups fish separately. And while the setnetters were beached most of the summer, the driftnetters took in more than 23 million pounds of sockeye for a total profit of $32 million, slightly higher than 2011, when they captured $30 million of fish. Driftnetters were allowed to fish because very few kings swim in the middle of Cook Inlet, where drifters work.

Read the full story at the Alaska Dispatch>>

Inside the Industry

The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission recently released the preliminary agenda and public comment process for its 75th annual meeting which will be held October 23-27 in Bar Harbor, Maine.

 

Read more ...

The Obama Administration recently announced that it is looking for candidates to be considered for a sustainable fishing prize.

The White House Champion for Change for Sustainable Seafood designation will honor individuals for “contributing to the ongoing recovery of America’s fishing industry and our fishing communities.”

Read more ...
Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
Address
Country
U.S. Canada Other

City
State/Province
Postal/ Zip Code
Email