National Fisherman

Scientists cannot find traces of oil in the deep water of the Gulf of Mexico three years after the nation's worst offshore spill, but residual toxins are still in the sediment along the coastal marshes, according to scientists at the University of Tennessee who have studied the effects of the spill.

Bacteria in the Gulf was already adapted to consuming oil that naturally leaks from the ground into the water there, said Terry Hazen, a Governor's Chair for Environmental Biotechnology at UT and Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

When the Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded in April 2010, dumping 200 million gallons of crude into the Gulf, the population of that unique bacteria exploded and consumed the oil at a remarkable rate, said Hazen, who was a professor at University of California-Berkeley at the time.

"The Gulf has an amazing capacity to take care of these things, including a lot of other organics and things coming out of the Mississippi River," Hazen said. "I'm not saying that everything is hunky-dory but there is a lot of cleaning capacity there. Oil is a natural product, it's just fossilized algae. So the ability to degrade oil is always there in nature."

Hazen was part of a team of researchers that tracked the oil during and in the months following the spill. His team used a new approach to discover these oil-eating bacteria. Thanks to a contract UT has with BP, he is now leading a team that is examining other potential deep-sea drilling sites around the world looking for similar bacteria.

Read the full story at the Knoxville News>>

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

SeaShare, a non-profit organization that facilitates donations of seafood to feed the hungry, announced on Wednesday, July 29 that it had partnered up with Alaska seafood companies, freight companies and the Coast Guard, to coordinate the donation and delivery of 21,000 pounds of halibut to remote villages in western Alaska. 

On Wednesday, the Coast Guard loaded 21,000 pounds of donated halibut on its C130 airplane in Kodiak and made the 634-mile flight to Nome.

Read more...

The New England Fishery Management Council  is soliciting applications for seats on the Northeast Trawl Survey Advisory Panel and the deadline to apply is July 31 at 5:00 p.m.

The panel will consist of 16 members including members of the councils and the Atlantic States Fishery Commission, industry experts, non-federal scientists and Northeast Fisheries Science Center scientists. Panel members are expected to serve for three years.

Read more...
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