National Fisherman


GALLOWAY — With lines straining and creaking in the deck cleats, Warren and Karen Unkert circled the lost ghost traps with their boat. As the tension on the ropes build, the corpse of the stubborn crab pot finally lifts from the muck of the bay bottom.

There is now one less hazard to boaters and, for the time being, crabs.

"On the sonar you can actually see the pot. We'd mark it, go back, and Warren would tell me when to throw the hook," said Karen Unkert, standing among some 500 lost-and-found crab traps stacked alongside Nacote Creek, the harvest from this winter's crab-trap recovery project in Great Bay.

Commercial crab traps comes in various sizes, but nearly all are made of a metal frame with mesh wiring and have strategically placed holes to allow the crustaceans to crawl in, but not out. Trappers can drop dozens of traps at a time, marked by small buoys, and retrieve them days or weeks later.

Read the full story at the Asbury Park Press>>

Inside the Industry

The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation announced last week the sixth round of grant awards from its Fisheries Innovation Fund, a program launched in 2010 to foster innovations that support sustainable fisheries in the United States. 

The goal of the Fisheries Innovation Fund is to sustain fishermen and fishing communities while simultaneously rebuilding fish stocks.

Read more...

Alaskan Leader Fisheries will give Inmarsat’s new high-speed broadband maritime communications service, Fleet Xpress, a try on the 150-foot longline cod catcher/processor Alaskan Leader.

Read more...

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