National Fisherman

The Maine legislature is considering a bill backed by Gov. Paul LePage that would eliminate the legal bar to allowing lobsters caught by accident in the nets of trawlers to be landed in Portland — a change that could induce the owner of the state's largest fleet of groundfishing boats to abandon Gloucester's port for the primary one in his home state.

Between 12 and 15 Portland boats unload in Gloucester, in part to cash in on the lobsters landed as bycatch along with groundfish; the Maine boats account for a significant proportion of the groundfish landed and sold in Gloucester, according to Kristian Kristensen, who owns the Cape Ann Seafood Exchange, but a small proportion of the lobsters.

The influential Maine Lobstermen's Association opposes the bill filed by Sen. Ann Haskell of Portland. By far the dominant state in lobster landings — by a factor of 10 ahead of the No. 2 state, Massachusetts — Maine is the region's only coastal state to prevent the sale of lobsters hauled up as bycatch.

Patrice McCarron, executive director of the Maine Lobstermen's Association, said her organization is supportive of the groundfishing industry, but believes that traps are the only responsible way to fish for lobster. Traps, she said in an telephone interview Tuesday, discourage large lobsters and egg-bearing females from getting caught and law requires and traps allow for the safest release of egg-bearing females.

Read the full story at the Gloucester Daily Times>>

Inside the Industry

NMFS recently released a draft action plan for fish discard and release mortality science, creating a list of actions that they hope can better inform fisheries.

We know that fishermen have to deal with bycatch by discarding or releasing unwanted catch overboard, but there is a data gap regarding how those fish survive.


A new study has identified a set of features common to all ocean ecosystems that provide a visual diagnosis of the health of the underwater environment coastal communities rely on.

Together, the features detail cumulative effects of threats -- such as overfishing, pollution, and invasive species,  allowing responders to act faster to increase ocean resiliency and sustainability.

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