National Fisherman


”We do not want to be forgotten. This is our hope.”

Those were the words of Rikuzentakata Mayor Futoshi Toba in a message posted on the Internet to “our friends overseas” after the March 11, 2011, tsunami swept away most of the once prosperous Japanese city.

Thousands of miles away in Crescent City, 35 boats were crushed and most of the harbor's docks were swept away as a series of surges generated by the magnitude-9.0 earthquake flowed through the harbor, but spared the town with its own history of wave-driven devastation.

Two years later it appears Rikuzentakata and Crescent City are connected once again with the discovery of a small, barnacle-encrusted boat that washed up just south of the Del Norte County city earlier this week.

Read the full story at Daily Breeze>>

Inside the Industry

NOAA recently published a proposed rule that would implement a traceability plan to help combat IUU fishing. The program would seek to trace the origins of imported seafood by setting up reporting and filing procedures for products entering the U.S.

The traceability program would collect data on harvest, landing, and chain of custody of fish and fish products that have been identified as particularly vulnerable to IUU fishing and fraud.

Read more...

The following was released by the Maine Department of Marine Resources on Jan. 22:

The Maine Department of Marine Resources announced an emergency regulation that will support the continued rebuilding effort in Maine’s scallop fishery. The rule, effective January 23, 2016, will close the Muscle Ridge Area near South Thomaston and the Western Penobscot Bay Area.

Read more...
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