National Fisherman

PORTLAND, Oregon – The Pacific Fishery Management Council today adopted a set of ocean salmon seasons that provides both recreational and commercial opportunities coastwide. California and Oregon fishermen, in particular, will benefit from strong abundance forecasts for Sacramento and Klamath River fall Chinook this year.

The recommendation will be forwarded to the National Marine Fisheries Service for approval by May 1, 2013.

"It's nice to see another strong year for ocean salmon fisheries off California and Oregon, with reasonable seasons north of Cape Falcon, Oregon, through the state of Washington," said Council Chairman Dan Wolford. "At the same time, the Council has satisfied all the conservation goals for over 50 salmon stocks."

California and Oregon South of Cape Falcon, Oregon

The Sacramento River and Klamath River fall Chinook abundance remains high, providing ample sport and commercial ocean salmon fisheries off California and Oregon. Fisheries south of Cape Falcon, in northern Oregon, are primarily supported by Sacramento River fall Chinook. In 2008 and 2009, poor Sacramento returns led to the largest ocean salmon fishery closure on record. The abundance forecast of Sacramento River fall Chinook in 2013 is 834,200, similar to 2012 and far above the number needed for optimum spawning this fall (122,000-180,000 fish). The Klamath River fall Chinook ocean abundance forecast for 2013 0f 727,600 is the third highest forecast on record since 1985.

Read the full story at the Seattle Times>>

Inside the Industry

NMFS recently released a draft action plan for fish discard and release mortality science, creating a list of actions that they hope can better inform fisheries.

We know that fishermen have to deal with bycatch by discarding or releasing unwanted catch overboard, but there is a data gap regarding how those fish survive.


A new study has identified a set of features common to all ocean ecosystems that provide a visual diagnosis of the health of the underwater environment coastal communities rely on.

Together, the features detail cumulative effects of threats -- such as overfishing, pollution, and invasive species,  allowing responders to act faster to increase ocean resiliency and sustainability.

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