National Fisherman


Proposed legislation that would allow Maine's groundfishermen to sell lobsters that they unintentionally catch in their trawling nets has led to some fierce debate among different sections of the state's fishing community. On one side are the fishermen, who have traditionally relied on harvesting flounder, pollock, haddock and other types of groundfish. With this fishery facing huge cuts, the ability to sell lobster bycatch to supplement the regular catch is regarded by them as a crucial source of additional revenue. But those who lobster for a living are opposed to the proposal. Tom Porter reports.

Jim Odlin owns and operates three groundfishing vessels out of Portland. He says there's a lot at stake.

The state stands to lose a whole industry," says Odlin, who was at the State House Monday to testify at a public hearing in favor of LD 1097 - an Act to Allow the Sale of Incidentally Caught Lobsters. This would allow groundfishermen who pick up lobster by-catch in some offshore federal waters, to sell it at the Portland fish market.

Maine is the only New England fishing state that prohibits the practice. Massachusetts, for example, allows fishermen to land up to 500 lobsters per 5-day fishing trip. As a result, Odlin says his boats have been forced to unload in Massachusetts, rather than in Portland, Maine, where they're based. And he says that is costing Maine jobs.

Read the full story at Maine Public Broadcasting Network>>

Inside the Industry

The American Fisheries Society is honoring recently retired Florida Institute of Oceanography director Bill Hogarth with the Carl R. Sullivan Fishery Conservation Award — one of the nation's premier awards in fisheries science - in recognition of his long career and leadership in preserving some of the world's most threatened species, advocating for environmental protections and leading Florida's scientific response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Read more...

The Marine Stewardship Council has appointed Eric Critchlow as the new U.S. Program Director. Critchlow will be based in the MSC US headquarters in Seattle. He is a former vice president of Lusamerica Foods and has over 35 years in the seafood industry.

Read more...
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